Sunday, April 25, 2010

Dominant Seventh Chord - Arpeggios - Functioning Part VIII

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Now we will revisit the diatonic dominant seventh chords for C Harmonic Minor
and play them as an arpeggio.
An arpeggio is to play the notes that belong to one chord, in sequence going up or down in tone. Arpeggio is from Italian meaning "to play on a harp".


The natural tension tones from harmonic minor for the
G dominant seventh are: G7, G7b9, G7/b9/11, G11/b9/b13.

G, Ab, B, C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, B, C, D, Eb, F,    G
R, b2, 3, 4, 5, b6,  b7, 8, b9, 10,1112,b13,b7, 1/8/R


G7 = R, 3, 5, b7                                   = G, B, D, F
Gb9 = R, 3, 5, b7, b9                           = G, B, D, F, Ab
G11b9 = R, 3, 5, b7, b9, 11,                = G, B, D, F, Ab, C
G11/b9/b13 = R, 3, 5, b7, b9, 11,b13  = G, B, D, F, Ab, C, Eb
The scale used is C harmonic Minor.


Assignment: Record this progression in all keys and play the appropriate minor scale (shown) using quarter then eighth notes on another track or with a friend. Also on the dominant seventh chord play the given arpeggio up then down in tone.




i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of C harmonic minor:
Cm // Abmaj7 // Dm7b5 // G7b9 //// ////

G7 = R, 3, 5, b7 = G, B, D, F                        play up G, B, D, F, down D, B, G
G7/b9 = R, 3, 5, b7, 9 = G, B, D, F, A          play up G, B, D, F, Ab, down F, D, B, G
G7/b9/11 = R, 3, 5, b7, 9, 11, = G, B, D, F, A, C                                                   play up G, B, D, F, Ab, C, down Ab, F, D, B, G
G11/b9/b13 = R, 3, 5, b7, 9, 11, 13 = G, B, D, F, A, C, E                                      play up G, B, D, F, A, C, E, down C, A, F, D, B, G


Now play the dominant seventh chord and all its natural tensions arpeggio style. Do this for each key.



i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of C# harmonic minor:
C#m //A#maj7 // D#m7b5 // G#7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of D harmonic minor:
Dm // Bbmaj7 // Em7b5 // A7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of Eb harmonic minor:
Ebm // Bmaj7 // Fm7b5 // Bb7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of E harmonic minor:
Em // Cmaj7 // F#m7b5 // B7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of F harmonic minor:
Fm // Dbmaj7 // Gm7b5 // C7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of F# harmonic minor:
F#m // Dmaj7 // G#m7b5 // C#7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of G harmonic minor:
Gm // Ebmaj7 // Am7b5 // D7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of Ab harmonic minor:
Abm //Emaj7 // Bbm7b5 // D#7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of A harmonic minor:
Am // Fmaj7 // Bm7b5 // E7b9 //
i, VI, ii7b5 , V7b9 in the key of Bb harmonic minor:
Bbm // Gbmaj7// Cm7b5 // F7b9 //


C# Db same note different name (enharmonic) also D# Eb, F# Gb, G# Ab, A# Bb.





Now record (or have a friend play) these progressions in all fifteen keys using all diatonic dominant natural extensions.


Also do the progressions at a very slow tempo to hear tension and release of chords. Start at 50 BPM. Then increase by 10 BPM every cycle of fifteen keys.








Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.


Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Monday, April 19, 2010

Diatonic Substitutions - Part 1

Using the C major scale (Major Key Substitutions) lets look at the most common diatonic (within the scale) substitutions.

Original progression: C //// F //// G //// C ////
First substitution: Am //// F //// G //// C //// (replace C major with A minor)
Second substitution: Am7 //// F //// G //// C //// (replace C major with A minor seventh)
Third substitution: Em //// F //// G //// C //// (replace C major with E minor)
Fourth substitution: Em7 //// F //// G //// C //// (replace C major with E minor seventh)

The Tonic or I chord (C major chord) can be replaced with the iii,
Em or Em7 or the vi, Am or Am7.

Original progression: C //// F //// G/// C ////
First substitution: C //// Dm //// G //// C //// (replace F major with D minor)
Second substitution: C //// Dm7 //// G //// C //// (replace F major with D minor seventh)
Third substitution: C //// Am //// G //// C //// (replace F major with A minor)
Fourth substitution: C //// Am7 //// G //// C //// (replace F major with A minor seventh)

The Subdominant or IV chord or F major can be replaced with the ii, or vi chords i.e. Dm, Dm7 or Am, Am7. Also Dm or Am with F major.

Original progression: C //// F //// G/// C ////
First substitution: C //// F //// Bo //// C //// (replace G major or G7 with B diminished)
Second substitution: C //// F //// Bm7b5 //// C //// (replace G major or G7 with B minor seventh flat fifth)

The Dominant or V7 (G7) or V (G) chord can be replaced with the Diminished chord viio -
B diminished or B minor seventh flat fifth.
Also Bo, Bm7b5 can replace the G or G7.

Using the A minor scale (Minor Key Substitutions) lets look at the most common diatonic (within the scale) substitutions. A minor is the Relative Minor also called the Aeolian mode.

The Im (minor seventh) replaced with the (b III) Major or Major Seventh
Original progression: Am7//// Dm7 //// Em7 //// Am7 ////
Substitution progression: Cmaj7 //// Dm7 //// Em7 //// Am7 ////

The IVm (minor seventh) replaced with the (Viio) Diminished or Minor Seventh Flat Fifth
or the (bVI) F major or F Major Seventh
Original progression: Dm7//// Em7 //// Am7 ////
Substitution progression: Bo //// Em7 //// Am7 ////
or Bm7b5 //// Em7 //// Am7 //// or
Fmaj7 //// Em7 //// Am7 ////

The Vm (minor seventh) replaced with the (bVII) G Dominant Seventh
Original progression: Dm7//// Em7 //// Am7 ////
Substitution progression: Dm7 //// G7 //// Am7 ////

The Vm (minor seventh) replaced with the Dominant Seventh or Diminished or Diminished Seventh
Original progression: Dm7//// Em7 //// Am7 ////
Substitution progression: Dm7 //// E7 //// Am7 ////

Original progression: Dm7//// Em7 //// Am7 ////
Substitution progression: Dm7 //// G#o //// Am7 ////
or Dm7 //// G#o7 //// Am7 ////

As always transpose to all keys!

All materials (c) 2010. For personal use only.
Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music.

Family of Chords - Song Writing 101

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