Saturday, November 26, 2011

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part IX

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part VIII

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part VII

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part VI

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part V

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part IV

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part III

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions Part II

Creating Melody With Common Chord Progressions

Variations on a Melody Part XXXVII

Variations on a Melody Part XXXVI

Variations on a Melody Part XXXV

Variations on a Melody Part XXXIV

Variations on a Melody Part XXXIII

Variations on a Melody Part XXXII

Variations on a Melody Part XXXI

Variations on a Melody Part XXX

Variations on a Melody Part XXIX

Variations on a Melody Part XVIII

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Variations on a melody

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.



http://www.vincelauria.com/blog/2011/02/variations-on-a-melody.html

Bi-Tonal Arpeggios Part IV

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.


This is similar to Polytonal Chords I - IV see
Polytonal Chords



This technique allows you to create a bigger tension chord by playing two different chords in a row arpeggio style. Remember to play low to high in tone - starting with the low tones on the left to the higher tones going right.
The following examples are harmonic major arpeggios created from the C harmonic major scale.

Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.


C harmonic major note names = C, D, E, F, G, Ab, B, C, D, E, F, G, Ab, B, C

C harmonic major scale numbers = 1/R, 2, 3, 4, 5, b6, 7, 8/R, 9, 10,11, 12, b13, 14, 15/R


C major seventh - C, E, G, B
D minor seventh flat fifth - D, F, Ab, C
Together = C, E, G, B, D, F, Ab, C = C major eleventh add flat thirteenth or Cmaj11/b13
Number formula = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, b13th


F minor major seven - F, Ab, C, E
G dominant seventh - G, B, D, F
Together = F, Ab, C, E, G, B, D, F = F minor major nine add sharp eleventh and thirteenth or Fm maj9/#11/13
Number formula = R, b3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, #11th, 13th


C major seventh - C, E, G, B
G seventh third inversion - F, G, B incomplete
Together = C, E, G, B, F, G, B = C major seventh add eleventh or Cmaj7/11
Number formula = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 11th


F diminished - F, Ab, B
F minor major seventh - C, E incomplete
Together = F, Ab, B, C, Eb = F diminished add double flat sixth add major seventh
or Fo/bb6/7
(synonyms = C major seventh add eleventh sharp fifth or Cmaj7/11+)
Number formula = R, b3rd, b5th, bb6th, 7





Assignment: Record each of these chords (last chord given in each example) - using quarter note strums for five to ten minutes. Then using quarter then eighth notes on another track or with a friend - play the bi-tonal arpeggio up in tone then down in tone.



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.


Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Bi-Tonal Arpeggios Part III

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.

This is similar to Polytonal Chords I - IV see
Polytonal Chords



This technique allows you to create a bigger tension chord by playing two different chords in a row arpeggio style. Remember to play low to high in tone - starting with the low tones on the left to the higher tones going right.
The following examples are melodic minor arpeggios created from the C melodic minor scale. (Jazz melodic minor - ascending and descending same notes)

Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.


C melodic minor note names = C, D, Eb, F, G, A, B, C, D, Eb, F, G, A, B, C

C melodic minor scale numbers = 1/R, 2, b3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8/R, 9, b10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15/R


C minor major seventh - C, Eb, G, B
D minor seventh - D, F, A, C
Together = C, Eb, G, B, D, F, A, C = C minor major thirteenth or Cm maj13
Number formula = R, b3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th


F dominant seventh - F, A, C, Eb
G dominant seventh - G, B, D, F
Together = F, A, C, Eb, G, B, D, F = F dominant nine add sharp eleventh and thirteenth or
F9/#11/13
Number formula = R, 3rd, 5th, b7th, 9th, #11th, 13th


C minor major seventh - C, Eb, G, B
G seventh - F, G, B, D third inversion
Together = C, Eb, G, B, F, G, B, D = C minor major ninth add eleventh or Cm maj9/11
Number formula = R, b3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th


F major sharp eleventh - F, A, B
F dominant seventh - C, Eb, F, A second inversion
Together = F, A, B, C, Eb, F, A = F dominant seventh add sharp eleventh or F7/#11
Number formula = R, 3rd, 5th, b7th, #11th





Assignment: Record each of these chords (last chord given in each example) - using quarter note strums for five to ten minutes. Then using quarter then eighth notes on another track or with a friend - play the bi-tonal arpeggio up in tone then down in tone.



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.


Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Friday, February 4, 2011

Bi-Tonal Arpeggios Part II

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.


















This is similar to Polytonal Chords I - IV see
Polytonal Chords



This technique allows you to create a bigger tension chord by playing two different chords in a row arpeggio style. Remember to play low to high in tone - starting with the low tones on the left to the higher tones going right.
The following examples are harmonic minor arpeggios created from the C harmonic minor scale.

Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.


C harmonic minor note names = C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, B, C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, B, C

C harmonic minor scale numbers = 1/R, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, 7, 8/R, 9, b10,11, 12, b13, 14, 15/R


C minor major seventh - C, Eb, G, B
D minor seventh flat fifth - D, F, Ab, C
Together = C, Eb, G, B, D, F, Ab, C = C minor major eleventh add flat thirteenth or Cm maj11/b13
Number formula = R, b3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, b13th


F minor seven - F, Ab, C, Eb
G dominant seventh - G, B, D, F
Together = F, Ab, C, Eb, G, B, D, F = F minor nine add sharp eleventh and thirteenth or
Fm9/#11/13
Number formula = R, b3rd, 5th, b7th, 9th, #11th, 13th


C minor major seventh - C, Eb, G, B
G seventh third inversion - F, G, B incomplete
Together = C, Eb, G, B, F, G, B = C minor major seventh add eleventh or Cm maj7/11
Number formula = R, b3rd, 5th, 7th, 11th


F diminished - F, Ab, B
F minor seventh - C, Eb incomplete
Together = F, Ab, B, C, Eb = F minor seventh flat five add double flat sixth or Fm7b5/bb6 (synonyms = C minor major seventh eleventh sharp fifth or Cm maj7/11+)
Number formula = R, b3rd, b5th, b7th, bb6th





Assignment: Record each of these chords (last chord given in each example) - using quarter note strums for five to ten minutes. Then using quarter then eighth notes on another track or with a friend - play the bi-tonal arpeggio up in tone then down in tone.



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.


Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Bi-Tonal Arpeggio

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.


This is similar to Polytonal Chords I - IV see
Polytonal Chords



This technique allows you to create a bigger tension chord by playing two different chords in a row arpeggio style. Remember to play low to high in tone - starting with the low tones on the left to the higher tones going right.
The first examples are major arpeggios created from the C major scale.

Every note position in a major scale is assigned a coinciding number position.


Example given in key of C major. Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.


C major note names = C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

C major scale numbers = 1/R, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8/R, 9, 10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15/R


C major seventh - C, E, G, B
D minor seventh - D, F, A, C
Together = C, E, G, B, D, F, A, C = C major thirteenth or Cmaj13
Number formula = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th


C major sixth - C, E, G, A
B minor seventh flat fifth - B, D, F, A
Together = C, E, G, A, B, D, F, A = C major sixth add seventh, nine, eleventh and thirteenth or
Cmaj 6/7/9/11/13
Number formula = R, 3rd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th


C major seventh - C, E, G, B
G seventh third inversion - F, G, B incomplete
Together = C, E, G, B, F, G, B = C major seventh add eleventh or Cmaj7/11
Number formula = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 11th


F major sharp eleventh - F, A, B
F major - C, E incomplete
Together = F, A, B, C, E = F major seventh sharp fourth or Fmaj7#11 (also written Fmaj7#4)
Number formula = R, 3rd, #4, 5th, 7th





Assignment: Record each of these chords (last chord given in each example) - using quarter note strums for five to ten minutes. Then using quarter then eighth notes on another track or with a friend - play the bi-tonal arpeggio up in tone then down in tone.



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.


Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Chord Nucleus Concept Part IV

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.

In the earlier blog: Music Chord Theory Part I though IV
I discussed some of the most important chords and there number formulas. By memorizing
the most common chords you can create your own unique chord voicings and any chord.
Every note position in a major scale is assigned a coinciding number position.


Example given in key of C major. Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.


C major note names = C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

C major scale numbers = 1/R, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8/R, 9, 10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15/R



Buy taking a basic form or shape then adding, sharping or flattening specific tones you can create any chord.


Major = R, 3rd 5th (in the key of C or C as the starting or root note the notes are C, E, G).
Minor = R, b3rd, 5th (by flatting or lowering the 3rd scale degree of the C major scale to Eb you create C minor = C, Eb, G. b means flat or one half step lower in tone on guitar one fret distance towards head).
Augmented = R, 3rd, #5 (in the key of C the notes are C, E, G#. # means sharp or one half step higher in tone towards body.
Diminished = R, b3rd, b5th (in the key of C the notes are C, Eb, Gb).


Diminished chords:
Minor major 7th/b5 = R, b3rd, b5th, 7th in C = C, Eb, Gb, B.
Minor 7th/b5 = R, b3rd, b5th, b7th in C = C, Eb, Gb, Bb.
Diminished 7th = R, b3rd, b5th, bb7th in C = C, Eb, Gb, A.
Diminished /b6 = R, b3rd, b5th, b6th in C = C, Eb, Gb, Ab. (synonym Ab7 1st inversion)
Diminished /bb6 = R, b3rd, b5th, bb6th in C = C, Eb, Gb, G.
Diminished /b9 = R, b3rd, b5th, b9th in C = C, Eb, Gb, Db.
Diminished /9 = R, b3rd, b5th, 9th in C = C, Eb, Gb, D.
Diminished /#9 = R, b3rd, b5th, #9th in C = C, Eb, Gb, D#. (synonym Ab7 1st inversion)
Diminished /##9 = R, b3rd, b5th, ##9th in C = C, Eb, Gb, E. (synonym Ab7+ 1st inversion)
Diminished /11 = R, b3rd, b5th, 11th in C = C, Eb, Gb, F
Diminished /9/11 = R, b3rd, b5th, 9th, 11th in C = C, Eb, Gb, D, F.
Diminished /9/#11 = R, b3rd, b5th, 9th, #11th in C = C, Eb, Gb, D, F#.
Diminished /#9/#11 = R, b3rd, b5th, #9th, #11th in C = C, Eb, Gb, D#, F#.
Diminished 7th/9 = R, b3rd, b5th, bb7th, 9th in C = C, Eb, Gb, A, D.
Diminished 7th/11 = R, b3rd, b5th, bb7th, 11th in C = C, Eb, Gb, A, F.
Diminished 7th/9/11 = R, b3rd, b5th, bb7th, 9th, 11th in C = C, Eb, Gb, A, D, F.







Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

For guitar learn above chord forms on all four string groups: EAD, ADG, DGB, GBE.
















All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.
















Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Chord Nucleus Concept Part III

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.


In the earlier blog: Music Chord Theory Part I though IV
I discussed some of the most important chords and there number formulas. By memorizing
the most common chords you can create your own unique chord voicings and any chord.
Every note position in a major scale is assigned a coinciding number position.


Example given in key of C major. Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.

C major note names = C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

C major scale numbers = 1/R, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8/R, 9, 10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15/R



Buy taking a basic form or shape then adding, sharping or flattening specific tones you can create any chord.


Major = R, 3rd 5th (in the key of C or C as the starting or root note the notes are C, E, G).
Minor = R, b3rd, 5th (by flatting or lowering the 3rd scale degree of the C major scale to Eb you create C minor = C, Eb, G. b means flat or one half step lower in tone on guitar one fret distance towards head).
Augmented = R, 3rd, #5 (in the key of C the notes are C, E, G#. # means sharp or one half step higher in tone towards body. Also + is sometimes used instead of #5.
Diminished = R, b3rd, b5th (in the key of C the notes are C, Eb, Gb).


Augmented chords:
Major 7th+ = R, 3rd, #5th, 7th in C = C, E, G#, B.
Major 9th+ = R, 3rd, #5th, 7th, 9th in C = C, E, G#, B, D.
Major/9th+ = R, 3rd, #5th, 9th in C = C, E, G#, D.
Major 11th+ = R, 3rd, #5th, 7th, 9th, 11th in C = C, E, G#, B, D, F.
Major 13th+ = R, 3rd, #5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th in C = C, E, G#, B, D, F, A.
Major sus 2+ = R, 2nd, #5th in C = C, D, G#.
Major 6th+ = R, 3rd, #5th, 6th in C = C, E, G#, A. (also called Am maj7 1st inversion)
Major 6/9+ = R, 3rd, #5th, 6th, 9th in C = C, E, G#, A, D.








Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

For guitar learn above chord forms on all four string groups: EAD, ADG, DGB, GBE.
















All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.
















Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Chord Nucleus Concept Part II

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.

In the earlier blog: Music Chord Theory Part I though IV I discussed some of the most important chords and there number formulas. By memorizing
the most common chords you can create your own unique chord voicings and any chord.
Every note position in a major scale is assigned a coinciding number position.
Example given in key of C major. Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.
C major note names = C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

C major scale numbers = 1/R, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8/R, 9, 10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15/R


Buy taking a basic form or shape then adding, sharping or flattening specific tones you can create any chord.


Major = R, 3rd 5th (in the key of C or C as the starting or root note the notes are C, E, G).
Minor = R, b3rd, 5th (by flatting or lowering the 3rd scale degree of the C major scale to Eb you create C minor = C, Eb, G. b means flat or one half step lower in tone on guitar one fret distance towards head).
Augmented = R, 3rd, #5 (in the key of C the notes are C, E, G#. # means sharp or one half step higher in tone towards body.
Diminished = R, b3rd, b5th (in the key of C the notes are C, Eb, Gb).
Minor chords:
Minor 6th = R, b3rd, 5th, 6th in C = C, Eb, G, A.
Minor 7th = R, b3rd, 5th, b7th in C = C, Eb, G, Bb.
Minor 9th = R, b3rd, 5th, b7th, 9th in C = C, Eb, G, Bb, D.
Minor/9th = R, b3rd, 5th, 9th in C = C, Eb, G, D.
Minor 6/9 = R, b3rd, 5th, 6th, 9th in C = C, Eb, G, A, D.
Minor 11th = R, b3rd, 5th, b7th, 9th, 11th in C = C, Eb, G, Bb, D, F.
Minor/11th = R, b3rd, 5th,11th in C = C, Eb, G, F.
Minor 13th = R, b3rd, 5th, b7th, 9th, 11th, 13th in C = C, Eb, G, Bb, D, F, A.
Minor 6/maj7 = R, b3rd, 5th, 6th, 7th in C = C, Eb, G, A, B. (from C melodic minor)
Minor 6/9/maj7 = R, b3rd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 9th in C = C, Eb, G, A, D, B.
Minor 6/11 = R, b3, 5th, 6th, 11th in C = C, Eb, G, A, F.
Minor maj7 = R, b3, 5th, 7th in C = C, Eb, G, B.
Minor maj7/9 = R, b3, 5th, 7th, 9th in C = C, Eb, G, B, D.
Minor maj7/9/11 = R, b3, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th in C = C, Eb, G, B, D, F.
Minor maj7/9/11/13 = R, b3, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th in C = C, Eb, G, B, D, F, A.


Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

For guitar learn above chord forms on all four string groups:

EAD, ADG, DGB, GBE.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.
Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Chord Nucleus Concept

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.

In the earlier blog: Music Chord Theory Part I though IV
I discussed some of the most important chords and there number formulas. By memorizing
the most common chords you can create your own unique chord voicings and any chord.
Every note position in a major scale is assigned a coinciding number position.


Example given in key of C major. Number positions are the same for all fifteen keys.

C major note names = C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C

C major scale numbers = 1/R, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8/R, 9, 10,11, 12, 13, 14, 15/R



Buy taking a basic form or shape then adding, sharping or flattening specific tones you can create any chord.


Major = R, 3rd 5th (in the key of C or C as the starting or root note the notes are C, E, G).
Minor = R, b3rd, 5th (by flatting or lowering the 3rd scale degree of the C major scale to Eb you create C minor = C, Eb, G. b means flat or one half step lower in tone on guitar one fret distance towards head).
Augmented = R, 3rd, #5 (in the key of C the notes are C, E, G#. # means sharp or one half step higher in tone towards body.
Diminished = R, b3rd, b5th (in the key of C the notes are C, Eb, Gb).


Major chords:
Major 6th = R, 3rd, 5th, 6th in C = C, E, G, A.
Major 7th = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th in C = C, E, G, B.
Major 9th = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th in C = C, E, G, B, D.
Major/9th = R, 3rd, 5th, 9th in C = C, E, G, D.
Major 6/9 = R, 3rd, 5th, 6th, 9th in C = C, E, G, A, D.
Major 11th = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th in C = C, E, G, B, D, F.
Major 13th = R, 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 11th, 13th in C = C, E, G, B, D, F, A.
Major sus = R, 4th, 5th in C = C, F, G.
Major sus 2 = R, 2nd, 5th in C = C, D, G.










Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

For guitar learn above chord forms on all four string groups: EAD, ADG, DGB, GBE.
















All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.
















Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Reflections on Music Theory Blog

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.

As the new year begins another chance to grow and progress. I hope that this blog has helped you to understand and apply music theory to real life applications. I am blessed to teach and play music for a living. I want each sincere student to reach his and her goals and to put aside the time each day to accomplish their goals. This time for yourself will be the best investment in your life, that can not be affected by being rich or poor, famous or obscure.


In the end after all is said and done our vibration lives in eternity.
When you can try to help someone progress just a little for in each student lies great potential!
I know that music has saved my life and I feel humbled to be a servant to its cause.


All the best in life,


Vince Lauria

Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Applying Modes In A Blues Idiom Part V

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.




Record or have a friend play this standard twelve bar blues in C - then play the same mode for each chord (key). Remember to first play quarter notes slowly - refrain from playing at a tempo where each note is not clean. Once comfortable gradually increase speed and eventually move to eighth notes using this same process.

C7 //// //// //// //// F7 //// //// C7 //// //// G7 //// //// C7 //// //// :| repeat sign

Over the C dominant seventh chord play the C mixolydian b9 scale.

The C mixolydian b9 scale is the same as the

F harmonic major scale except the C is the root or key note. C, Db, E, F, G, A, Bb, C



Over the F dominant seventh play the F mixolydian b9 scale.

The F mixolydian b9 scale is the same as the

B flat harmonic major scale except the F is the root or key note. F, Gb, A, Bb, C, D, Eb, F



Over the G dominant seventh play the G mixolydian b9.

The G mixolydian b9 scale is the same as the

C harmonic major scale except the G is the root or key note. G, Ab, B, C, D, E, F, G



Also play each mode for each position (register) of your instrument.

I or I7 = C dominant seventh (you can substitute C13/b9 for C7)

IV or IV7 = F dominant seventh (you can substitute F13/b9 for F7)

and V or V7 = G dominant seventh (you can substitute G13/b9 for G7)

For more chord substations see:

2010.01.10: Harmonic Major Modes - Mixolydian b9 - Diatonic Substitutions - Mode 5



Apply the same modes for the following common blues progressions:

12 Bar - Long-Changes

I //// | //// | //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|



12 Bar - Quick-Change

I //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|



8 Bar

I //// | //// |

IV //// |

I //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :|



Also for additional ideas reference previous blog

2010.02.10: Eight Most Common Blues Scales For Improvisation

Remember as always to transpose to all keys.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Sunday, January 2, 2011

Applying Modes In A Blues Idiom Part IV

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.



Record or have a friend play this standard twelve bar blues in C - then play the same mode for each chord (key). Remember to first play quarter notes slowly - refrain from playing at a tempo where each note is not clean. Once comfortable gradually increase speed and eventually move to eighth notes using this same process.

C7 //// //// //// //// F7 //// //// C7 //// //// G7 //// //// C7 //// //// :| repeat sign

Over the C dominant seventh chord play the C phrygian dominant scale.

The C phrygian dominant scale is the same as the

F harmonic minor scale except the C is the root or key note. C, Db, E, F, G, Ab, Bb, C



Over the F dominant seventh play the F phrygian dominant scale.

The F phrygian dominant scale is the same as the

B flat harmonic minor scale except the F is the root or key note. F, Gb, A, Bb, C, Db, Eb, F



Over the G dominant seventh play the G phrygian dominant scale.

The G phrygian dominant scale is the same as the

C harmonic minor scale except the G is the root or key note. G, Ab, B, C, D, Eb, F, G



Also play each mode for each position (register) of your instrument.

I or I7 = C dominant seventh (you can substitute C7/b9 for C7)

IV or IV7 = F dominant seventh (you can substitute F7/9 for F7)

and V or V7 = G dominant seventh (you can substitute G7/b9 for G7)

For more chord substations see:

2009.11.17:

Harmonic Minor Modes - Phrygian Dominant - Diatonic Substitutions - Mode 5



Apply the same modes for the following common blues progressions:

12 Bar - Long-Changes

I //// | //// | //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|



12 Bar - Quick-Change

I //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|



8 Bar

I //// | //// |

IV //// |

I //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :|



Also for additional ideas reference previous blog

"Eight Most Common Blues Scales For Improvisation"

from 2010.02.10

Remember as always to transpose to all keys.





All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Saturday, January 1, 2011

Applying Modes In A Blues Idiom Part III

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.





Record or have a friend play this standard twelve bar blues in C - then play the same mode for each chord (key). Remember to first play quarter notes slowly - refrain from playing at a tempo where each note is not clean. Once comfortable gradually increase speed and eventually move to eighth notes using this same process.

C7 //// //// //// //// F7 //// //// C7 //// //// G7 //// //// C7 //// //// :| repeat sign



Over the C dominant seventh chord play the C mixolydian b6 scale.
The C mixolydian b6 scale is the same as the
F melodic minor scale except the C is the root or key note. C, D, E, F, G, Ab, Bb, C


Over the F dominant seventh play the F mixolydian b6 scale.
The F mixolydian b6 scale is the same as the
B flat melodic minor scale except the F is the root or key note. F, G, A, Bb, C, Db, Eb, F


Over the G dominant seventh play the G mixolydian b6 scale.
The G mixolydian b6 scale is the same as the
C melodic minor scale except the G is the root or key note. G, A, B, C, D, Eb, F, G




Also play each mode for each position (register) of your instrument.
I or I7 = C dominant seventh (you can substitute C11 or C9 for C7)
IV or IV7 = F dominant seventh (you can substitute F11 or F9 for F7)
and V or V7 = G dominant seventh (you can substitute G11 or G9 for G7)
For more chord substations see:
2009.12.09: Melodic Minor Modes - Mixolydian b6 - Diatonic Substitutions - Mode 5


Apply the same modes for the following common blues progressions:
12 Bar - Long-Changes


I //// | //// | //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|






12 Bar - Quick-Change

I //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|






8 Bar

I //// | //// |

IV //// |

I //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :|













Also for additional ideas reference previous blog










"Eight Most Common Blues Scales For Improvisation"










from 2010.02.10














































Remember as always to transpose to all keys.


































All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.



















Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Applying Modes In A Blues Idiom Part II

Vince Lauria on iTunes | YouTube | IMDb | AmazonMP3 All materials copyright © 2010 Vince Lauria | www.vincelauria.com.




Record or have a friend play this standard twelve bar blues in C - then play the same mode for each chord (key). Remember to first play quarter notes slowly - refrain from playing at a tempo where each note is not clean. Once comfortable gradually increase speed and eventually move to eighth notes using this same process.

C7 //// //// //// //// F7 //// //// C7 //// //// G7 //// //// C7 //// //// :| repeat sign



Over the C dominant seventh chord play the C lydian dominant scale.
The C lydian dominant scale is the same as the
G melodic minor scale except the C is the root or key note. C, D, E, F#, G, A, Bb, C


Over the F dominant seventh play the F lydian dominant scale.
The F lydian dominant scale is the same as the
C melodic minor scale except the F is the root or key note. F, G, A, B, C, D, Eb, F


Over the G dominant seventh play the G lydian dominant scale.
The G lydian dominant scale is the same as the
D melodic minor scale except the G is the root or key note. G, A, B, C#, D, E, F, G




Also play each mode for each position (register) of your instrument.
I or I7 = C dominant seventh (you can substitute C9 for C7)
IV or IV7 = F dominant seventh (you can substitute F9 for F7)
and V or V7 = G dominant seventh (you can substitute G9 for G7)

For more chord substations see:
2009.12.06: Melodic Minor Modes - Lydian Dominant - Diatonic Substitutions - Mode 4


Apply the same modes for the following common blues progressions:
12 Bar - Long-Changes


I //// | //// | //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|






12 Bar - Quick-Change

I //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// |

IV //// | //// |

I //// | //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :| or I //// | V //// :|






8 Bar

I //// | //// |

IV //// |

I //// |

V //// |

IV //// |

I //// | //// :|













Also for additional ideas reference previous blog










"Eight Most Common Blues Scales For Improvisation"










from 2010.02.10














































Remember as always to transpose to all keys.


































All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.




















Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

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